Advanced Solid-State Logic:
Flip-Flops, Shift Registers, Counters, and Timers:
Introduction and Objectives

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OVERVIEW OF THE NEED FOR ADVANCED LOGIC

Modern solid-state devices have incorporated advanced logic functions such as latches and flip-flops to store the state (1 or 0) of the logic bits used in the previous section. The AND and OR gates provide simple logic functions, but more advanced logic functions are required to store the state of a bit or to count and provide time delay. Counting and timing are basic functions of nearly all industrial applications. This section begins with the explanation of a simple latch and several types of flip flops. It continues through shift registers, counters, and timers. We will demonstrate how these solid-state devices are used in various industrial applications.

Objectives of this section:

1. Explain the need for solid-state logic devices that can store and shift bits to provide counting and timing functions.

2. Explain the operation of an RS latch and de scribe the condition of each output when each input is applied.

3. Discuss the operation of the edge-triggered RS flip-flop, the edge-triggered JK flip-flop, and the edge-triggered D flip-flop.

4. Provide an example of an industrial application that uses flip-flops and explain the operation of the application.

5. Explain the operation of a bit shift register and describe the condition of the output of each flip-flop as the shift-register clock pulse is applied.

6. Provide an example of an industrial application that uses a bit shift register and explain the operation of the application.

7. Explain the operation of a word shift register.

8. Provide an example of an industrial application that uses a word shift register and ex plain the operation of the application.

9. Explain the operation of a first-in, first-out (FIFO) register.

10. Provide an example of an industrial application that uses FIFO and explain the operation

of the application.

11. Explain the operation of an up counter and a

down counter. Provide an industrial application that uses an up/down counter.

12. Explain the operation of a decoder.

13. Describe the operation of a one-shot timer. Provide an industrial application that uses a one-shot timer.

14. Explain the operation of the 555 timer chip. Describe its use in the astable and multistable modes.



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