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Cleanrooms (part 1)



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A cleanroom:

  • is a contamination-"free" environment for high-tech manufacturing and assembly

  • is an environment that has a low (or more accurately controlled) level of environmental pollutants such as airborne microbes, aerosol particles, dust, chemical vapors, etc. The level of contamination is specified by the number of particles per meter-cubed and by maximum particle size

  • may be very small chambers, also known as microenvironments

  • may be very large, such an entire manufacturing facility; large clean rooms are also known as ballrooms

  • is used extensively in semiconductor manufacturing, biotechnology, life and health sciences, pharmaceutical, aerospace, food, medical devices and hospitals and other fields that are especially sensitive to environmental contamination

Cleanrooms are kept clean by:

  • filtering outside air and recirculating (and simultaneously re-filtering) cleanroom air via high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and ultra low-penetration air (ULPA) filters to remove internally created contaminants; the air may also be sterilized using high-temperature heat exchanger

  • regulating staff to wear cleanroom suits and /or other protective clothing such as hats, face masks, boots and coveralls

  • regulating or prohibiting the use of materials such as paper, pencils, and fabrics made from natural fibers

  • using low-contaminating equipment inside the environment
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Updated: Tuesday, 2008-08-19 17:14 PST