Electronic Testing Equipment Construction Manual--Contents and Intro

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Contents

Section 1: AUDIO TEST GEAR

  • AF Generator
  • Wien Bridge
  • The Circuit
  • Construction.
  • Testing and Calibration
  • Squarewave Testing
  • The Test Bench Amplifier
  • The Circuit
  • Construction
  • In Use
  • Audio Millivoltmeter
  • Linearity
  • The Circuit
  • Construction
  • Calibration
  • In Use

Section 2: METERS

  • Voltage Loading
  • High Resistance Voltmeter
  • The Circuit
  • Construction
  • Calibration
  • Transistor Tester
  • Gain and Leakage
  • The Circuit
  • Construction
  • In Use
  • Capacitance Meter
  • Pulse Duration
  • The Circuit
  • Construction
  • Calibration
  • AF Frequency Meter
  • Basic Operation
  • The Circuit
  • Construction.
  • Calibration

Section 3: PROBING

  • Home Constructor Probes
  • Analog Probe
  • The Circuit.
  • Construction
  • Calibration
  • CMOS Probe
  • The Circuit.
  • Construction
  • In Use
  • TTL Probe

Preface

With modem electronics tending to become ever more complex, whether of the commercial or home constructed varieties, a good range of test equipment is an increasingly important part of the electronics enthusiasts' "armory". A good multimeter has long been regarded as the most important item of test equipment, and it almost certainly remains so, acquisition for those who can afford one. However, these main items of test equipment can not deal with all eventualities, and are not appropriate for all situations. For example, few multimeters or oscilloscopes permit the testing of transistors or capacitors.

In this guide some simple and inexpensive pieces of test equipment are described. They have been designed to fill in the gaps covered by most multimeters, and to cover the checking of both linear and digital circuits. Stripboard layouts are provided for all the designs, together with wiring diagrams where appropriate, plus notes on their construction and use. While the designs should prove useful for the more experienced readers, they are not beyond the capabilities of newcomers to the hobby. Apart from providing the constructor with a useful range of test gear, building these projects should also be an interesting and rewarding exercise in its own right. An oscilloscope also remains an important.

Warning!

Never make tests on any mains powered equipment that is plugged into the mains unless you are quite sure you know exactly what you are doing.

Remember that capacitors can hold their charge for some considerable time even when equipment has been switched off and unplugged.


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