Guide to Surface Mount Devices and Surface Mount Technology (SMD, SMT) -- Contents and Intro

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Contents

Section 1--SURFACE MOUNT TECHNOLOGY

1. What is SMT?

2. The development of SMT

3. Industrial SMT Circuit Production

4. The Place of SMT

5. Amateur Construction with SMDs

Section 2--PASSIVE SURFACE MOUNT COMPONENTS

1. Chip Components

2. Chip Resistors

3. Chip Capacitors

4. Chip Inductors

5. Supporting Cast

Section 3--SURFACE MOUNT SEMICONDUCTORS

1. Availability

2. Diodes Diodes Diodes

3. Transistors

4. Integrated Circuits

Section 4--PCB LAYOUT DEVELOPMENT

1. Getting Started

2. Ugly Construction

3. Protoboard Construction

4. Direct PCB Design

5. Designing a Photopositive

6. Computer Based Design

Section 5--HAND WORKING WITH SMDs

1. Selecting the Substrate

2. Working Conditions

3. Chip Control

4. The Perfect Joint

5. More Gadgets

Section 6--ADDITIONAL METHODS

1. Solder Paste and Reflow

2. Rework and Repair

3. PCB Protection

App 1 E6, E12, E24 VALUES

App 2 EIA CODE/VALUES

App 3 CAPACITANCE CONVERSION TABLES

App 4 A SELECTION OF POPULAR SM AND TH TRANSISTOR EQUIVALENTS

App 5 MINIMUM FOOTPRINT AREAS FOR HAND SOLDERING

App 6 DEVICE OUTLINES--ACTUAL SIZE

App 7 APPROXIMATE RANGE OF VALUES OF 50V CHIP CAPACITORS AVAILABLE IN THE POPULAR DIELECTRICS






Preface

The biggest change in electronic construction since the invention of the printed circuit board is sweeping the industry.

Surface Mount Technology or SMT is now responsible for some 50% of all circuit fabrication. As conventional component insertion machinery wears out it is increasingly being replaced with Surface Mount pick and place machines. SMT gives us lower cost, better reliability and above all miniature consumer goods.

It all started with highly compact portable devices, like organizers, mobile phones and miniature amateur transceivers.

SMT is now widespread and CD players, disc drives and PC mother boards are made entirely from surface mount devices. In compact Hi-Fi and many TV receivers, even the power output stages can be fully surface mount. Satellite LNBs rely on surface mount microwave stripline techniques.

SMT is not confined to mass production. Surface Mount Devices (SMDs) are easy to use for hand working. Hobbyist electronic and radio constructors, professionals building proto types or laboratory one-offs can all use SM construction to advantage. No more drilling, sometimes hundreds of holes, for component leads. Circuit board layout is easier to design and you won't have to cope with (mirror image) tracking on the reverse side of the PCB. Soldering components in place is a much simpler task, without repeatedly turning the PCB over.

No more snipping off component pigtails. As a bonus, the working circuit is neat, compact and in keeping with modern commercial practice.

This guide is intended as an introduction to the complete beginner who may never have seen a chip component. It will also appeal to those with experience of conventional construction methods who want to learn new skills at an introductory level. Schools covering elementary electronics will find it useful, giving students a feel for contemporary fabrication methods. The reader will see that SMT has the depth and scope of a subject in its own right, rather than an extension of Through-Hole Technology. It is above all a practical guide to real hands-on work with SMDs. Although intended to be read, the impulsive browser like myself will also find it interesting.

The difficulties associated with their tiny size are tackled head on. The reader will soon become totally comfortable in this dimension and reluctant to return to the macro world of THT.

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Please Note:

Although every care has been taken with the production of this guide to ensure that any projects, designs, modifications and/or programs, etc., contained herewith, operate in a correct and safe manner and also that any components specified are normally available in Great Britain, the Publishers do not accept responsibility in any way for the failure, including fault in design, of any project, design, modification or program to work correctly or to cause damage to any other equipment that it may be connected to or used in conjunction with, or in respect of any other damage or injury that may be so caused, nor do the Publishers accept responsibility in any way for the failure to obtain specified components.

Notice is also given that if equipment that is still under warranty is modified in any way or used or connected with home-built equipment then that warranty may be void.


Also see: Electronic Techniques--Soldering, Shop Practices and Construction (for industry, classroom, DIY and hobby; using pre-computer and CAD-less methods)

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