Experimental Antenna Topics-- Contents and Preface

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Contents

Part 1:

1. The Abe Lincoln Antenna

2. Antenna Impedance Modification

3. Between Antennas

4. Cold Antennas

5. The Crossed Field Antenna

6. The Dielectric Clad Antenna

7. Doubly Fed Coax Antennas

8. Frequency Independent Antennas

9. Gain and Efficiency

10. Helical Antennas

11. Inductance Design

12. Interference Effects

13. Long and Short Dipoles

Part 2:

14. Loop and Frame Antennas

15. Matching and Balancing

16. The Phased Array

17. Reflecting Elements

18. Refractive Index of Free Electron Layers

19. The Skin Effect

20. Sky Wave Antenna

21. Standing Wave Interference in Domestic TV

22. Substitutes for V.H.F. Whip Antennas

23. Thermal Noise in the Antenna

24. Use of a Parasitic Element

25. Using the Pattern of TV Signal Maxima

26. Wave Traps

27. The Windom Antenna

28. The Yagi-Uda Array




Although nearly a century has passed since Marconi's first demonstrations of radio communication, there is still research and experiment to be carried out in the field of antenna design and behavior.

The aim of the experimenter will be to make a measurement or confirm a principle, and this can be done with relatively fragile, short-life apparatus.

Because of this, devices described in this guide make liberal use of cardboard, cooking foil, plastic bottles, cat food tins, etc. These materials are, in general, cheap to obtain and easily worked with simple tools, encouraging the trial-and-error philosophy which leads to innovation and discovery.

Although primarily a practical guide with text closely supported by diagrams, some formulae which can be used by straightforward substitution and some simple graphs have also been included.


Preface:

Although nearly a century has passed since Marconi's first demonstrations of radio communication, there is still research and experiment to be carried out in the field of antenna design and behavior.

The aim of the experimenter will be to make a measurement or confirm a principle, and this can be done with relatively fragile, short -life apparatus. Because of this, devices described in this guide make liberal use of cardboard, cooking foil, plastic bottles, cat food tins, etc. These materials are, in general, cheap to obtain and easily worked with simple tools, encouraging the trial-and-error philosophy which leads to innovation and discovery.


Warning!

The young and less experienced experimenter should test and measure the antennas described here using battery-operated equipment. Mains -driven apparatus should be left for the mature expert.

Note:

The symbol λ [Greek letter lambda] is used throughout this guide to denote wavelength.


 

Also see:

Industrial Electronics (in the early 1960s)

199 Electronic Test & Alignment Techniques (1972)

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