Guide to FET Circuits--Article Index

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Content

  1. FUNDAMENTALS of the FET
  2. Amplifier Circuits
  3. Oscillator Circuits
  4. Receiver and Receiver-Accessory Circuits
  5. Transmitter and Transmitter-Accessory Circuits
  6. Control Circuits
  7. Intrument Circuits

Sub-Section A: TERMINAL GUIDE FOR DIODES AND TRANSISTORS

Sub-Section B: MANUFACIURERS OF SEMICONDUCTORS

Sub-Section C: DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS



Introduction

The field-effect transistor is a comparatively new semiconductor device. Its chief merit is its high input impedance, a feature which makes it more adaptable than the conventional (or bipolar) transistor to tube-type circuits. But it also possesses those qualities that recommend all transistors: simplicity; small size; ruggedness; instant operation; high overall efficiency; and freedom from hum, microphonics, and, in most cases, generation of heat.

Now that the FET is commercially available at comfortable prices, designers and experimenters at all levels are showing interest in its applications. This book attempts to meet the demand for practical information on the subject.

The numerous tested circuits described on the following pages cover the field of applications from amplifiers to test instruments and will be especially interesting to experimenters and hobbyists.

(A great many of the circuits contain only one or two FETs.) This collection is made up of circuits which survived impartial tests to eliminate those which gave only marginal performance.

The reader may use these circuits singly or in such combinations as his needs suggest. The present collection by no means exhausts the possibilities of FET application; therefore, many of these circuits might also serve as idea generators.

The author is grateful to Siliconix Incorporated (Sunnyvale, California) and to Texas Instruments, Inc. (Dallas, Texas), who kindly supplied operating data and generous samplings of their field-effect transistors for use in developing the circuits described in this guide.

[Note: This guide is based on Sams "FET Circuits", pub'd in 1965]

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