Guide to Advanced Robotics -- Contents and Intro

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Contents

  1. Definitions, Examples, and Ideas


  2. The Domesticated Android


  3. Use, Operation, and Construction of a Radio-Controlled Robot


  4. Robot Control Programming


  5. Programming the Prab Versatran Robot


  6. Robot "Hands" and Arm Kinematics


  7. A Computer-Operated Hobby Robot


  8. The ASEA Robot System


  9. Robotic Eyes


  10. More on Robotic Vision and Speech


  11. Ranging Systems


  12. Numerically Controlled Robotic Machines


  13. Ideas and Discussions

Introduction

Robotics is more than just a word, it is a reality. It means, essentially, the doing of something with computer-controlled machines. These machines are different. They are different as people are different and are given to different likes and dislikes, tasks and interests. There are some who say that robotics is an art, the art of getting the impossible from machines. There are others who say that robotics is a science, the science of doing with uncanny quickness and precision, tasks which we as humans can do, but don't like to do, or find it very boring to do. Then, there is the impossible. In this category we find chores where breathing is impossible, or where we would burn up readily.

Recall a machine that cleans the hulls of large ships: a scrubber. It is equipped with fast rotating brushes of special alloys and a gripping force to cause the scrubber to adhere to the side of the ship under water. That little scrubber does all its cleaning automatically, under programmed instructions from its computerized brain.

There is a story about a man on an automobile assembly line. He was a good worker, intelligent, and aggressive. He became bored with the task of continually inserting bolts into pre-drilled holes, hour after hour. One day he decided not to insert the bolts as he had been inserting them in the past- just to give his task some interest and variation. He cross threaded them, used short bolts and sometimes didn't use any bolts at all. Your imagination can fill out the further details of this story and what interesting and imaginative things you can come up with as you think about the various people who bought those cars! Robots can scrub or put bolts in holes forever- assuming that the power is kept on and the mechanics don't fail. Robots do not get tired or bored or even interested in what is going on. They just do what their little computerized brains tell them to do. Of course, some robots have really big brains but require knowledgeable, scientific human types to keep them operating smoothly.

You will, no doubt, immediately think of other applications for these machines. Although we hate to admit it, we can come up with one more reason for having a machine do tasks for us. They can do it better! Yes, it's true, they can do it better, for a longer period of time, and more consistently than any human can ever do. You see they have one advantage-they do not get tired! If we ask the fundamental question, will machines and computers take over the world? We will find that we've a disagreement on our hands. Some look at the exploding field of robotics and say there is no doubt that someday machines will control everything. These persons worry about jobs and activities and-yes, it is true -a loss of control over the machines by the humans who make them. They envision that someday machines will be making machines which control machines, etc. ad infinitum.

One thing is sure, no one has ever seen a machine making love, so there may be hope. Indeed, there is hope for all of us for an ever increasingly pleasurable future due to the fact that machines are around and doing things for us.

I extend my gratitude to the many companies and individuals who provided me with information, discussions, questions, and answers for this guide. Their illustrations are most informative. Now, for a trip through the fascinating world of advanced robotics, turn this page and keep going.

Acknowledgments

Thanks to the following companies for their cooperation in making this guide possible.

  1. American Robot, P.O. Box 10767, Winston-Salem, NC, 27108


  2. PRAB Conveyors, Inc., 5944 East Kilgore Road, Kalamazoo, MI, 49003


  3. Advanced Robotics, Newark Industrial Park, Hebron, OH


  4. Texas Instruments, P.O. Box 1443, Houston, TX 77001


  5. Quasar Industries, 59 Meadow Road, Rutherford, NJ 07070


  6. Heuristics, Inc., 900 San Antonio Road, Los Altos, CA, 94022


  7. Solfan, 665 Clyde Avenue, Mountain View, CA, 94043


  8. Jerry Rebman Electronics, 5439 Doliver, Houston, TX, 77027


  9. Robotics Today, The Strand Building, Peterborough, NH 03458


  10. Cincinnati Milacron, 4701 Marburg Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45209


  11. ASEA Electronics Division, Vasteras, Sweden General Electric, Optoelectronic Systems, Electronics Park, Syracuse, NY 13201


  12. Spatial Data Systems, 508 Fairview Drive, Goleta, CA, 93017


  13. Polaroid, Ultrosonic Ranging Marketing, 784 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA, 02139


  14. Mountain Hardware, 300 Harvey West Boulevard, Santa Cruz, CA 95060


  15. Ohio Scientific, 1355 South Chillocothe Road, Aurora, OH 44202


  16. Radio Shack, a division of Tandy Corporation, Fort Worth, TX


  17. Microbot, 1259 El Camino Real, Suite 200, Menlo Park, CA 94025


  18. Manca, Inc., Leitz Building, Rockleigh, NJ 07647


  19. Camac Kenetic Systems, 11 Maryknoll Drive, Lockport, IL 60441


  20. Kilobaud Micro-computing, 73 Pine Street, Peterborough, NY, 03458


  21. ACE Radio Control, Higginsville, MO, 64037


  22. Tele-sensory, Inc., P.O. Box 10099, Palo Alto, CA 94304


  23. Planet Corporation, 27888 Orchard Lake Road, Farmington Hills, MI, 48018


  24. Robotics Age, P.O. Box 725, La Canada, CA 91011


  25. Apple Computer, Inc., 10200 Bandley Drive, Cupertino, CA, 95014

Also see: Ultimate Guide to Industrial Robotics ; All About Robots (1987 Electronics Digest article)

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